Art & Technology: Value Manifesto

Introduction – What is Value Manifesto

Last week the Value Manifesto project has officially launched. As trimplement, we are proud to be part of this exciting undertaking.

In this article we are going to elaborate on the technical concepts of the project – for those interested in what happens behind the curtains.

But before we dive into the details, let’s start with some high level information about the Value Manifesto project itself. 

Value Manifesto is an interdisciplinary project, combining modern art and cutting edge technologies (like Blockchain and IoT). It aims to establish a whole new category in arts. Extrapolating the commercial and economical aspects of art, Value Manifesto declares the art object’s value itself to be art. 

But what does Value Manifesto define to be the actual artwork? The Value Manifesto art objects are called “crypto multiples”. They unite art, craftsmanship and technology in a beautiful way. Every single one of the 250 nixie tubes devices is linked to a dedicated unique Token, stored on the Ethereum Blockchain. The tubes display the current market value of this limited artwork at any given time.

Like any valuable scarce resource on this planet, the Value Manifesto crypto multiples are also limited to 250 pieces.

The detailed explanation of the artistic concept behind Value Manifesto can be found on the project’s site: https://www.valuemanifesto.ch/

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Two computers placed opposite of each other, symbolizing the advantages of third party software over in-house development

Why Third-Party Solutions Bring First-Rate Results

Do it yourselfit’s an overrated mantra. 

At first, those three letters promise empowerment. You have full control over what you do and which way you want it to be done. Take fice, third-party software, we are on it ourselves. 

But then you stumble over the prerequisites. You have to know how to do it all in the first place. And that you have the right tools for the task. But that should be doable, too. I have a screwdriver lying around somewhere? And there must be a YouTube tutorial for this, right? 

Well, when it comes to the complex field of software development, the truth is a little more complicated. 

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Coding Smart Contracts – Tutorial Part II

How to use a smart contract from a java application

Photo of Natallia Martchouk, co-founder of trimplement
Natallia Martchouk, co-founder of trimplement, explains how to develop Ethereum smart contracts.

In Part I of my tutorial I’ve explained how to develop and deploy a simple smart contract. Today we will see how this deployed contract can be used in java applications. 

We are going to use Parity as Ethereum client and Web3j java library for interaction with Parity. I’m assuming that you already have installed Web3j, solc and Parity following “Prepare” instructions in Part I.

5. Get Parity Synced

First of all your Parity needs to get synchronized with the Ethereum testnet Rinkeby, meaning it needs to download the current database status to your local machine. Start your local parity with 

$parity --chain rinkeby --rpcapi "eth,net,web3,personal"

See also this documentation of Parity about getting synced.

In the meantime, we can prepare everything that we need to call our smart contract from a java application.

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Coding Smart Contracts – Tutorial Part I

How to Write, Deploy and Test a Smart Contract

Natallia Martchouk, co-founder of trimplement, the fintech enabler
Natallia Martchouk, co-founder of trimplement, explains how to develop Ethereum smart contracts.

In this article, I will give you a smart contract tutorial. It will tell you how to quickly write, test and deploy Ethereum smart contracts. My motivation is to help people to make the first steps. There are several good tutorials which helped me to get started. But I missed kind of a “cookbook recipe” for the entire journey, starting with the installation of tools and frameworks and ending with deployment to Ethereum and usage out of an application.

And so, I decided to write down all the steps involved and hope that you will find it helpful!

I’m working on a Mac, but I’ll provide links to the documentation of all tools and frameworks so that you’ll be able to find fitting instructions for your personal environment.

Today we will: 

  • Setup an environment that  allows you to write production-ready smart contracts
  • Write a simple smart contract
  • Test security and style guide issues with solhint
  • Write unit tests with a Truffle framework
  • Deploy the contract on the Rinkeby testnet using MetaMask and Remix
  • Execute calls on the deployed smart contract
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